January 28, 2022

​​​​If there is one thing Warth-Schröcken has in abundance, it is snow. The Warth-Schröcken resort is one of the snow-safest resorts in Europe, with an average of 36 feet of freshly done per year. Warth offers the safest conditions for carving into snow even far into springtime. The new 8-person gondola set up in 2017 is essential in making access to the slopes from Warth and Schröcken easier.

It is worth saying that Warth- Schröcken is an excellent destination for athletic skiers and families. Warth has several blue runs and ski schools, including Pauli’s ski Arena for children at the Salober Valley Station. If you are an ambitious ski, it is time you try the black runs around the Saloberjet. Gamssprung will challenge you, even if you are an expert.

Here is further insight into why you should visit Warth this season. 

Interesting Facts about Warth

  • 62.5 km beautiful ski runs
  • Pristine powder-snow slopes
  • 15 cable car and lift services
  • Numerous race tracks and fun slope
  • Run of Fame; the longest ski circuit in the Alps
  • Ski-in and ski-out, many accommodation options close to the slopes
  • Unique snow quality that lasts from December to April
  • Decently designed practice areas for kids

Why you should Visit Warth

Still not convinced? Here are two reasons Warth should be on your bucket list. 

Skiing and Snowboarding

Warth is an excellent ski resort because it is easy to navigate. If you are looking for a skiing resort with zero hurry, push and shove, Warth is your perfect destination. Warth has a skiable vertical off around 4-500m, just enough for the skiing experience.

The Lifts and the Terrain

Warth has first-class ski lifts connected to Lech by the Auenfeldjet gondola. The excellent finishing of the lift is a clear sign that Australians do not design anything halfway. Another lift to visit is the gondola from the village of Schroecken up into the resort area.

8 Comments

  1. Kathie

    What country is Warth in?

    Reply
  2. Jeff

    Austria
    Not Australia

    Reply
  3. Sally Maish

    Please correct “Australians” to “Austrians!!”

    Reply
  4. Miller

    Sorry to inform you that this town, Warth is not located in Australia, but rather Austria!!!

    Reply
  5. Dr Bill Riesser

    Australia? I don’t think that is in Europe…

    Reply
  6. Henry Fabian Jr MD

    Not sure Australians have much to do with an Austrian ski resort- minor typo

    Reply
  7. Dr Bill Riesser

    On the other hand, is it on some other planet called Warth? We seem to be getting a lot of typos hereabouts…

    Reply
  8. Dr Bill Riesser

    My dad went to College during WWII at U Geneva, where he competed for that highly academic university’s ski club against the athlete-rich elite schools in the mountains of that country. Those coaches, noting that my dad was coming quite close to their ski-specialist athletes, told him, “you could be quite good if you learned to ski properly”.

    “Proper” slalom skiing meant (at that time) standing erect and upright, but my dad had simply skied the gates in what had seemed to him best as a child on his own. The reason my dad was not winning every race in collegiate Switzerland was because to ski as a serious chemistry major in that lake town, he had to ride ten miles on a single speed bicycle up to the nearest skiable mountain then climb back up after each run, and could do that at most a couple of times a week with his serious studies, soccer team membership etc.

    In the 1960’s, Newsweek published an article about the “new French style” of Jean-Claude Killy who was a major Olympic champion. My dad had that article, picturing his protege (?) going through a gate, next to a photo of him skiing twenty years earlier in Switzerland. EVERY angle (torso, arm, elbows, poles, skis, knees, legs) in the two photos were identical. The Swiss coaches remained clueless for more than two decades about what they had been missing about how to win slalom races.

    Having grown up in Houston, and contracting polio from the first vaccinations, I never would have been a ski champion like my dad might have been had Shell not transferred him to Deer Park shortly after hiring him out of Cal. As perhaps the most talented skier ever at Cal (Berkeley), he had been offered a ski instructing manager job at one of the California resorts in the early 1950’s but he was already getting his doctorate in chemistry.

    A ski resort would be kind of a waste for me as I would only ride the gondola up, look briefly down the mountain, then ride the car back down. I certainly never learned any type of downhill skiing.

    Reply

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